The Top 10 Marketing Books for Entrepreneurs

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Are you connecting with your customers in the right way?

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/seomoz/~3/MtLFL0z8JLk/mozcon-why-and-how

Posted by ronell-smith

MozCon 2013 (left to right): Greg Gifford, Nathan Bylof, Nathan Hammer, Susan Wenograd, and myself

I remember my first MozCon like it was yesterday.

It’s the place where I would hear the quote that would forever change the arc of my career.

“The world is freaking complicated, so let me start with everything I don’t know,” said Google’s Avinash Kaushik, during the Q&A, after speaking at MozCon 2013. “Nine hundred years from now, I will fix what’s broken today. …Get good at what you do.”

Though I didn’t know it at the the time, those were words I needed to hear, and that would lead me to make some career decisions I desperately needed to make. Decisions I never would have made if I hadn’t chosen to attend MozCon, the Super Bowl of marketing events (in my opinion).

Walking into the large (gigantic) room for the first time felt like being on the Space Mountain ride at Disneyland. I hurriedly raced to the front to find a seat so I could take in all of the action.

Once settled in, I sat back and enjoyed the music as lights danced along the walls.

Who wouldn’t want to be here? I thought.

Once the show started and Rand walked out, I was immediately sold: The decision to attend MozCon was the right one. By the end of the show, I would be saying it was one of the best career decisions I could have made.

But I almost missed it.

How and why MozCon?

I discovered MozCon like most of you: while reading the Moz blog, which I had been perusing since 2010, when I started building a website for an online, members-only newsletter.

One of my friends, an executive at a large company, had recently shared with me that online marketing was blistering hot.

“If you’re focusing your energy anywhere else, Ronell, you’re making a mistake,” he said. “We just hired a digital marketing manager, and we’re paying her more than $90,000.”

Those words served as an imprimatur for me to eagerly study and read SEO blogs and set up Twitter lists to follow prominent SEO authors.

Learning SEO was far less fun than applying it to the website I was in the process of helping to build.

In the years that followed, I continued reading the blog while making steps to meet members of the community, both locally and online.

One of the first people I met in the Moz SEO community was Greg Gifford, who agreed to meet me for lunch after I reached out to him via DM on Twitter.

He mentioned MozCon, which at the time wasn’t on my radar. (As a bonus, he said if I attended, he’d introduce me to Ruth Burr, who I’d been following on Twitter, and was a hyooge fan of.)

I started doing some investigating, wondering if it was an event I should invest in.

Also, during this same period, I was getting my content strategy sea legs and had reached out to Jon Colman, who was nice enough to mentor me. He also recommended that I attend MozCon, not the least because content strategy and UX superstar Karen McGrane was speaking.

I was officially sold.

That night, I put a plan into action:

Signed up for Moz Pro to get the MozCon discount
Bought a ticket to the show
Purchased airline and hotel tickets through Priceline

Then I used to following weeks to devise a plan to help me get everything I could out of the show.

The conference of all conferences

Honestly, I didn’t expect to be blow away by MozCon.

For seven of the 10 previous years, I edited a magazine that helped finance a trade show that hosted tens of thousands of people, from all over the world.

Nothing could top that, I thought. I was wrong.

The show, the lights, the people — and the single-track focus — blew me away. Right away.

I remember Richard Baxter was the first speaker up that first morning.

By the time he was done sharing strategies for effective outreach, I was thinking, “I’ve already recouped my expense. I don’t plan to ever miss this show again.”

And I haven’t.

So important did MozCon become to me after that first show, that I began to plan summer travel around it.

How could one event become that important?

Five key reasons:

Content
People & relationships
Personal & career development

I’ll explore each in detail since I think they each help make my point about the value of MozCon. (Also, if you haven’t read it already, check out Rand’s post, The Case For & Against Attending Marketing Conferences, which also touches on the value of these events.)

#1 – Content

You expect me to say the content you’ll be privy to at MozCon is the best you’ll hear anywhere.

Yeah, but…

The show hand-picks only the best speakers. But these same speakers present elsewhere, too, right?

What I mean by “content” is that the information you glean holistically from the show can help marketers from all areas of the business better do their work.

For example, when I came to my first MozCon, I had a handful of clients who’d reached out to me for PR, media relations, branding, and content work.

But I was starting to get calls and emails for this thing called “content marketing,” of which I was only vaguely familiar.

The information I learned from the speakers (and the informal conversations between speakers and after the show), made it possible for me to take on content marketing clients and, six months later, head content marketing for one of the most successful digital strategy agencies in Dallas/Fort Worth.

There really is something for everyone at MozCon.

#2 – People & relationships

Most of the folks I talk to on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis are folks I met at one of the last four MozCons.

For example, I met Susan E. Wenograd at MozCon 2013, where we shared a seat next to one another for the entire event. She’s been one of my closest friends ever since.

MozCon 2015: I’m chastising Damon Gochneaur for trying to sell me some links — I’m kidding, Google.

The folks seated beside you or roaming the halls during the event are some of the sharpest and most accomplished you’ll meet anywhere.

They are also some of the most helpful and genuine.

I felt this during my first event; I learned the truth of this sentiment in the weeks, months, and years that have followed.

Whether you’re as green as I was, or an advanced T-shaped marketer with a decade of experience behind you, the event will be fun, exciting, and full of new tips, tactics, and strategies you can immediately put to use.

#3 – Personal & career development

I know most people make decisions about attending events based on the cost and the known value — that is, based on previous similar events, how much they are likely to earn, either in a new job, new work, or additional responsibilities.

That’s the wrong way to look at MozCon, or any event.

Let’s keep it real for a moment: No matter who you are, where you work, what you do, or how much you enjoy your work, you’re are ALWAYS in the process of getting fired or (hopefully) changing jobs.

You should (must) be attending events to keep yourself relevant, visible, and on top of your game, whether that’s in paid media, content, social media, SEO, email marketing, etc.

That’s why the “Is it worth it?” argument is not beneficial at all.

I cannot tell you how many times, over the last four years, when I’ve been stuck on a content strategy, SEO or web design issue and been able to reach out to someone I would never have met were it not for MozCon.

For example, every time I share the benefits of Paid Social with a local business owner, I feel I should cut Kane Jamison (met at MozCon 2014) a check.

So, go to MozCon, not because you can see the tangible benefits (you cannot know those); go to MozCon because your career and your personal development will be nourished by it far beyond any financial reward.

Now you know how I feel and what I’ve gleaned from MozCon, you’re probably saying, “Yeah, but how can I be certain to get the most out of the event?”

I’m glad you asked.

How you can get the most out of MozCon

First, start following and interacting with Twitter and Facebook groups to find folks attending MozCon.

Dive in and ask questions, answer questions, or set up a get-together during the event.

Next, during the event, follow the #mozcon Twitter hashtag, making note of folks who are tweeting info from the event. Pay close attention to not simply the info, but also what they are gleaning and how they plan to use the event for their work.

If you find a few folks sharing info germane to your work or experiences, it wouldn’t hurt to retweet them and, maybe later during the show, send a group text asking to get together during the pub crawl or maybe join up for breakfast.

Then, once the show is over, continue to follow folks on social media, in addition to reading (and leaving comments on) their blogs, sending them “Great meeting you. Let’s stay in touch” emails, and looking for other opportunities to stay in their orbit, including meeting up at future events.

Many of the folks I initially met at MozCon have become friends I see throughout the year at other events.

But, wait!

I mentioned nothing about how to get the most out of the event itself.

Well, I have a different philosophy than most folks: Instead of writing copious notes and trying to capture every word from each speaker, I think of and jot down a theme for each talk while the speaker is still presenting. Along with that theme, I’ll include some notes that encapsulate the main nuggets of the talk and that will help me remember it later.

For example, Dr. Pete’s 2016 talk, You Can’t Type a Concept: Why Keywords Still Matter, spurred me to redouble my focus (and my learning with regard to content and SEO) on search intent, on-page SEO, and knowing the audience’s needs as well as possible.

Then, once the show is over, I create a theme to encapsulate the entire event by asking myself three questions:

What did I learn that I can apply right away?
What can I create and share that’ll make me more valuable to teammates, clients or prospective clients?
How does this information make me better at [X]?

For the 2013 show, my answers were…

I don’t need to know everything about SEO to begin to take on SEO-related work, which I was initially reluctant to do.
Content that highlights my in-depth knowledge of the types of content that resonates with audiences I’d researched/was familiar with.
It makes me more aware of how how search, social, and content fit together.

After hearing Avinash’s quote, I had the theme in my head, for me and for the handful of brands I was consulting at the time: “You won’t win by running the competition’s race; make them chase you.”

MozCon 2013: Avinash Kaushik of Google

This meant I helped them think beyond content, social media, and SEO, and instead had them focus on creating the best content experience possible, which would help them more easily accomplish their goals.

I’ve repeated the process each year since, including in 2016, when I doubled-down on Featured Snippets after seeing Taking the Top Spot: How to Earn More Featured Snippets, by Rob Bucci.

You can do the same.

It all begins with attending the show and being willing to step outside your comfort zone.

What say you?

Are you MozCon bound?

Count me in!

Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don’t have time to hunt down but want to read!


How to Grow Your Brand While Still Employed

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/salesandmarketing/~3/iq6PCQy3JfM/295823

Business coach Christy Wright chats about what she’s learned are the biggest hurdles and best strategies for aspiring business women.

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/growingyourbusiness/~3/BkkAv3r39c0/296121

Instead of eating into profits using expensive air delivery services, how can retailers send cargo more cost effectively?

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/growingyourbusiness/~3/Q94sRvlDofM/296333

Whether you’d like to improve your current job or find a new runway, here are five strategies to guide your job choices and approach.

The Most Expensive Keywords in the UK

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WordStreamBlog/~3/-0EEgI6qQJ4/most-expensive-keywords-uk-edition

In the coming weeks, in celebration of our revamped Free Keyword Tool (currently in beta), we’ll be releasing new infographics that reveal the most expensive keywords in five different currencies. Yesterday we saw the most expensive keywords for the U.S. dollar, and today we’re looking at the top 25 highest-CPC keywords in terms of the British pound.

We were fascinated to see how different the results were in the different currencies! I know our friends across the pond are dying to see what our study turned up, so without further ado, here they are, the 25 costliest keywords in the United Kingdom:

highest cost keywords in british pound

There is certainly some overlap in this dataset and the U.S. version – as is probably the case all around the world, finance-related keywords are among the priciest. You gotta spend money to make money, as they say!

Note: Spending money in casinos is not statistically the best way to make money. It is, however, very popular in Britain.

most expensive keywords in england

Bit of harmless fun

According to my buddy Dan Shewan, who grew up in England:

Culturally, Brits are much more relaxed about gambling than Americans. You guys may have Las Vegas and Atlantic City, but generally speaking, gambling is a cultural taboo in many parts of America. Not so in the U.K., where we’ll “have a flutter” on almost anything – the UEFA Champions League Final, disastrous snap elections, “dead pools” of celebrity death predictions, you name it.

My countrymen’s appetite for wagers of questionable taste notwithstanding, it doesn’t surprise me that the most expensive keywords in this list are focused on gambling and online casinos. Online gambling is an obscenely profitable industry in Great Britain. Between April 2015 and March 2016, online gambling contributed $5.7 billion (£4.5 billion) to the British economy alone, so it makes sense that the competition for and costs of these keywords is so high. It’s also very interesting to see that three of the four keywords in the Casino category are branded terms.

Here are a few more pockets of keywords that are especially pricy in the U.K. but didn’t turn up on the U.S. or other lists:

Real Estate

Says Dan:

The U.K. has been experiencing a severe housing crisis for several years. Home ownership is completely out of reach for many people (especially those poor Millennials), and public concern about the nation’s housing crisis is the highest it’s been in my lifetime.

What’s most interesting to me about this keyword data is the specific terms that we see above. The keyword “equity release” is included in the Finance category, but equity release refers to a British financial instrument that allows homeowners over the age of 55 to access the equity they have tied up in their property either as a lump-sum payment or via a series of installments in the form of a secured loan. After years of failed government austerity policies, it’s a little sad – but not at all surprising – to see more people searching for ways to access this equity as inflation has outpaced wage growth.

The “we buy any house” and “selling my house quickly” keywords are also very revealing. After years of rising house prices and skyrocketing rents, Britain’s housing market is finally beginning to stagnate, which could account for the popularity of these search terms. There’s a strong urgency to both these keywords; for property buyers hoping to turn a quick profit and capitalize on sellers’ desperation, and for beleaguered homeowners eager to minimize depreciation and cut their losses through a quick sale.

He also tells me “real estate” is a “very American phrase” that Brits don’t use! Sorry about that…

Examples of expensive keywords related to property include “we buy any house” (this is the name of a property company in the UK) and “estate agents Edinburgh.”

Elderly Care

Variations on “live-in care” almost broke the top 10. We didn’t see this specific set of keywords in the data set for any of the other currencies we looked at.

Vehicle Tracking

This is a GPS technology that allows you to track the location of a car – as one Amazon bestseller in the category puts it, “Whether it’s your child coming home from school, a suspicious spouse, a teenage driver, or valuable company assets,” vehicle tracking “keeps you up to date in real time.” Good news for you paranoid types!

Coffee!

Feeling strongly about coffee or the Oxford comma is no substitute for a personality trait (I can’t believe how often these are mentioned in Twitter bios or online dating profiles) but let it be known: I like coffee, and so do citizens of the United Kingdom.

the united kingdom's most expensive keywords

Keywords like “coffee machine rental” and “commercial coffee machines” made the list of highest CPC keywords, so we can be sure that U.K. businesses are doing their part to keep workers productive.

What keywords on the list stood out to you?

About the data

Here’s how we got the list: We pulled all the data collected from anonymous AdWords Performance Grader reports across all industries between June 1, 2016 and June 12, 2017, then looked at the top 1000 most expensive keywords seen during that time period and categorized them by core intent.

For example, we lumped the keywords “bail bonds” and “bail bonds los angeles” into a single category since the core intent is the same. Likewise, keywords involving different types of lawyers (such as “malpractice lawyer” and “injury lawyer”) or insurance were grouped together. We used a similar methodology last time so as to avoid featuring too many specific long-tail or local keywords that wouldn’t have broad applicability to a large number of businesses. We separated distinct services (pest control vs. termites) as much as possible.

We also filtered out keywords with less than 100 clicks from our data set. We only looked at advertisers bidding in USD, GBP, AUD, CAD, and ZAR, and analyzed different currencies separately. We also eliminated non-English ads and duplicates (where both the keyword and the CPC were exactly the same) from that set. The results you’re reading about in this article are in GBP.

Shout out to everyone who helped compile, analyze, and illustrate the data: our data analyst Josh Brackett, our web team leader Meg Lister, and our designer Kate Lindsay.

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/salesandmarketing/~3/_ZAvBWtrfiE/294046

Creating an offer that your audience can’t resist is easy if you use one of these four techniques.

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/crazyegg/~3/ZJFweg_14CM/

finish line

End-to-end testing is a term usually reserved for the product team. Put simply, such testing ensures the product will complete the tasks it is intended to in real life conditions from beginning to end. Interestingly, end-to-end testing is a proven content marketing strategy as well. From The Wirecutter’s in-depth gadget reviews to Michelle Phan’s face care and makeup tutorials, they’ve turned their end-to-end product experience into content. So why do they work? Let’s go over three concrete examples that show how different companies execute end-to-end testing in their content marketing. 1. Gain consumer trust to convert users End-to-end testing can…

The post 3 Reasons to Use End-to-End Testing in Your Content Marketing Strategy appeared first on The Daily Egg.

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It’s easier than ever to reach highly targeted buyers at a low cost.

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/entrepreneur/salesandmarketing/~3/8YiPWzd20yE/296252

Ninety-two percent of consumers trust referrals from people they know, and 77 percent of consumers are more likely to buy a new product when learning about it from friends or family.

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