The 2018 Local SEO Forecast: 9 Predictions According to Mozzers

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/seomoz/~3/zVDnwr6ep4Q/local-seo-forecast-2018

Posted by MiriamEllis

It’s February, and we’ve all dipped our toes into the shallow end of the 2018 pool. Today, let’s dive into the deeper waters of the year ahead, with local search marketing predictions from Moz’s Local SEO Subject Matter Expert, our Marketing Scientist, and our SEO & Content Architect. Miriam Ellis, Dr. Peter J. Myers, and Britney Muller weigh in on what your brand should prepare for in the coming months in local.

WOMM, core SEO knowledge, and advice for brands both large and small Miriam Ellis, Moz Associate & Local SEO SME LSAs will highlight the value of Google-independence

Word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM) and loyalty initiatives will become increasingly critical to service area business whose results are disrupted by Google’s Local Service Ads. SABs aren’t going to love having to “rent back” their customers from Google, so Google-independent lead channels will have enhanced value. That being said, the first small case study I’ve seen indicates that LSAs may be a winner over traditional Adwords in terms of cost and conversions.

Content will be the omni-channel answer

Content will grow in value, as it is the answer to everything coming our way: voice search, Google Posts, Google Questions & Answers, owner responses, and every stage of the sales funnel. Because of this, agencies which have formerly thought of themselves as strictly local SEO consultants will need to master the fundamentals of organic keyword research and link building, as well as structured data, to offer expert-level advice in the omni-channel environment. Increasingly, clients will need to become “the answer” to queries… and that answer will predominantly reside in content dev.

Retail may downsize but must remain physical

Retail is being turned on its head, with Amazon becoming the “everything store” and the triumphant return of old-school home delivery. Large brands failing to see profits in this new environment will increasingly downsize to the showroom scenario, significantly cutting costs, while also possibly growing sales as personally assisted consumers are dissuaded from store-and-cart abandonment, and upsold on tie-ins. Whether this will be an ultimate solution for shaky brands, I can’t say, but it matters to the local SEO industry because showrooms are, at least, physical locations and therefore eligible for all of the goodies of our traditional campaigns.

SMBs will hold the quality high card

For smaller local brands, emphasis on quality will be the most critical factor. Go for the customers who care about specific attributes (e.g. being truly local, made in the USA, handcrafted, luxury, green, superior value, etc.). Evaluating and perfecting every point of contact with the customer (from how phone calls are assisted, to how online local business data is managed, to who asks for and responds to reviews) matters tremendously. This past year, I’ve watched a taxi driver launch a delivery business on the side, grow to the point where he quit driving a cab, hire additional drivers, and rack up a profusion of 5-star, unbelievably positive reviews, all because his style of customer service is memorably awesome. Small local brands will have the nimbleness and hometown know-how to succeed when quality is what is being sold.

In-pack ads, in-SERP features, and direct-to-website traffic Dr. Peter J. Meyers, Marketing Scientist at Moz In-pack ads to increase

Google will get more aggressive about direct local advertising, and in-pack ads will expand. In 2018, I expect local pack ads will not only appear on more queries but will make the leap to desktop SERPs and possibly Google Home.

In-SERP features to grow

Targeted, local SERP features will also expand. Local Service Ads rolled out to more services and cities in 2017, and Google isn’t going to stop there. They’ve shown a clear willingness to create specialized content for both organic and local. For example, 2017 saw Google launch a custom travel portal and jobs portal on the “organic” side, and this trend is accelerating.

Direct-to-website traffic to decline

The push to keep local search traffic in Google properties (i.e. Maps) will continue. Over the past couple of years, we’ve seen local packs go from results that link directly to websites, to having a separate “Website” link to local sites being buried 1–2 layers deep. In some cases, local sites are being almost completely supplanted by local Knowledge Panels, some of which (hotels being a good example) have incredibly rich feature sets. Google wants to deliver local data directly on Google, and direct traffic to local sites from search will continue to decline.

Real-world data and the importance of Google Britney Muller, SEO & Content Architect at Moz Relevance drawn from the real world

Real-world data! Google will leverage device and credit card data to get more accurate information on things like foot traffic, current gas prices, repeat customers, length of visits, gender-neutral bathrooms, type of customers, etc. As the most accurate source of business information to date, why wouldn’t they?

Google as one-stop shop

SERPs and Maps (assisted by local business listings) will continue to grow as a one-stop-shop for local business information. Small business websites will still be important, but are more likely to serve as a data source as opposed to the only place to get their business information, in addition to more in-depth data like the above.

Google as friend or foe? Looking at these expert predictions, that’s a question local businesses of all sizes will need to continue to ask in 2018. Perhaps the best answer is “neither.” Google represents opportunity for brands that know how to play the game well. Companies that put the consumer first are likely to stand strong, no matter how the nuances of digital marketing shift, and education will remain the key to mastery in the year ahead.

What do you think? Any hunches about the year ahead? Let us know in the comments.


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How to Create a Reader Avatar for Your Blog

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/POaCUzUrp6E/

How to create a blog reader avatar

For several years, I’ve been using Reader Avatars (also called Reader Profiles or Personas) on my blogs – and I’ve found them very effective and helpful.

To create your first reader avatar, you’ll need to spend some time thinking and writing about a type of reader that you’re either attempting to reach or who is already reading your blog. Describe them in as much detail as you can – who they are, what their interests are, why they might be reading your blog and what their needs are.

(We’ve created a template you can use to help you do this, and I’ll be sharing some examples of my own reader avatars throughout this post.)

The idea is that you end up with a picture of who you’re writing for that you can then use to create posts that will resonate more strongly with your actual readers.

Before I talk about the benefits of doing this and make some suggestions on how to create reader avatars for your own blog, let me show you one that I first created several years ago for my photography site “Grace”
Mom-a-raz-zoGrace Momarazzo Avatar

Grace describes herself as a Mom-a-raz-zo photographer because 90% of her photos are of her young children. She’s 34 years old and lives in London.

She is in the market for an entry level DSLR and lens to help her capture her kids growing up. She studies photography is high school so has a basic understanding of how to use a camera, but until now has been using an entry level point and shoot camera.

Grace reads dPS for two reasons – firstly to help make a decision about which camera to buy. She’s a little nervous about making the choice and is looking for the advice of others. She’s also looking to connect with other Mom-a-raz-zo photographers and to learn how to improve her portrait photography.

Grace is a photography book addict – she subscribes to a photography magazine and has an expanding collection of portrait related photography books.

Grace dreams about one day making a little money from her photography – perhaps using what she learns in photographing her own children – to photograph other families. Her biggest obstacles in achieving this are a lack of confidence (she worries a lot about what others think of her work) and the equipment (which she is saving for).

Grace is on Facebook, is a heavy user of email and has a Flickr account.

The profile above describes one of the types of readers that we have on DPS – people whose main use of their cameras is to photograph their kids.

The profile describes why “Grace” reads DPS, some of her dreams, the type of photography she’s into, how else she uses the web, a little about her demographics, the level she’s at, and so on.

Here’s another one from a different type of reader at DPS:

“Keith”
Grey Nomadkeith grey nomad avatar

Keith is a first time digital camera owner. He’s recently retired and has bought an entry level DSLR to help him record an upcoming trip across the USA.

Keith reads dPS to work out how to get the mosts from his new camera, which to this point, he is using only in Automatic mode.

His needs and challenges are fairly beginner level and include learning about settings like Aperture, Shutter Speed and ISO, knowing how to get his images off his camera and to store them safely, as well as basic composition techniques.

Keith dreams of taking great landscapes, macro photography and a little portrait work.

Keith is on a budget, living off his savings. He is willing to spend a little to improve his photography but researches all purchases carefully.

Keith has been online for years, but his preferred way to connect online is email.

Again – I’ve described another type of reader in a similar way to the first.

In each of these cases the reader profile is based upon a reader group already within the Digital Photography School community. If you’re just getting started with your blog, this same exercise could be done with potential readers – or the type of person you want to read your blog.

Why Should You Create Reader Avatars?

Hopefully you can already see some of the benefits of these kinds of reader avatars – but let me list a few of the things I’ve found most useful:

It makes your blogging feel more relevant and personal – I find that having a person (real or pretend) in mind as I write reminds me that there are real people on the other end of my posts. There are people with faces, names and needs – I find it inspiring to visualise them reading what I write, and thinking about them helps me to write in a more personal tone.

It informs your writing – having these kinds of avatars in mind as I write reminds me of some of the problems and questions that readers might have. That leads me to write write more practical posts that focus on real readers’ needs. Often as I write, I visualise the questions and reactions that these different readers might have to my posts – and then try to build answers to those into what I’m writing.

It identifies opportunities – although it was several years ago now, I still remember writing the first profile above (Grace) and realising that quite a few of my readers have mentioned their dreams of one day making some money from their photography. As a result, I created a section of the DPS forum specifically about making money with photography … and later, we published an ebook on “Going Pro”.  (Note the forums are currently closed.)

It can be helpful for recruiting advertisers – potential advertisers will want to know what type of reader you have. You can simply share your reader avatars with them: no need to think through a new answer each time. This also shows that you’ve thought about your readers and run a professional site.

It identifies ways to connect with your readership – you’ll notice I’ve included details in the profiles on what else the reader does online. It’s really useful to know what other sites your reader uses and which social networks they prefer as this can identify opportunities to identify places where potential new readers hang out.

It will identify opportunities to monetize your blog – knowing what your readers currently spend money on, what their needs are, and what kind of income they have at their disposal will give you all kinds of ideas for the types of advertisers you should seek out, the type of affiliate promotions you could do and the type of products you could develop.How to Create a Reader Profile?

There are no real rules – you can see I’ve developed a certain style in my personas above. I added a picture to each of the type of person in the profile to further personalise it. I’d suggest trying to include information in the following areas:

Demographics – basic facts, like age, gender, nationality, and education level. You can use Google Analytics not only to see how many readers are coming from which countries, but also to see how your readers fall into different age categories, and what the balance of genders is. Google’s page on Demographics and Interests explains how this works.  

Financial situation – are your readers well off, secure, or just about managing? This will obviously affect the types of products you choose to promote as an affiliate, or create yourself.

Needs and/or challenges – what are your readers struggling with, or what are they keen to know about? With photography, for instance, readers like Grace will want to know how to capture their children as they grow up.

How they use the web – you might want to think about the other blogs they read, the news sites they visit, the social networks they’re active within, and whether they tend to browse on a computer or on a tablet / mobile (again, Google Analytics can give you insight into this).

Motivations for reading the blog – for instance, are your readers hobbyists or taking their first steps into a career related to your topic? Do they read your blog to be inspired, educated, or entertained?

Level of experience with the topic – are your readers total beginners, highly experienced, or something in between? You may want to create several reader avatars for people at different levels of experience and familiarity with the topic.

Dreams – what do they wish they could accomplish … and how can you help them get there? You might find that the emails you receive and the comments on your posts help you figure out what your readers’ dreams are.

Of course, this isn’t an exhaustive list – if you’ve created a reader avatar (or several) before, please feel free to share your suggestions and tips in comments below.

Let me finish this post off with one last persona – again for DPS.

“Gareth”
Going Progareth going pro avatar

Gareth (39 and living in Denver) prides himself on being one of the first people in his friendship group to own a digital camera. He invested heavily in a Sony Mavica that had the ability to take and store 9 images on a floppy disk!

Gareth sold his extensive film camera kit years back and fully converted to a Canon DSLR kit which he regularly updates and adds to whenever a new camera, lens or accessory comes onto the market. He also collects a range of other cameras – Liecas, Holgas and other more obscure models. He has a high disposable income.

Gareth works as a successful freelance designer but had recently put together a portfolio site for his photography and is on the way to going pro as a photographer.

Gareth knows most of what there is to know about photography – he is part of dPS because he loves to show his work and help others improve their photography. He’s also looking to increase his profile and exposure as a photographer.

Gareth photographs everything – he particularly loves live music photography, urban landscapes and anything experimental.

Gareth is an early adopter in many areas of life – he’s prolific in social media circles, has his own blog, Flickr account and is active on Facebook, Twitter and regularly uses Delicious for social bookmarking.


Now it’s over to you. Have a go at writing at least one reader avatar for your blog … and leave a comment below to let us know how you got on.  

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The post How to Create a Reader Avatar for Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

      


How to Work Productively on a Plane

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/nTlKUS_ijFw/

How to work productively when flying

If I look back at the key products and services I’ve created, they’ve all been influenced by productive groundwork done while travelling. Australia is a long way from most places, so when travelling to places like the USA, there are plenty of hours on the plane that can be filled with deep work.

I realise not everyone will want to spend time working as they travel. But it can be a super effective way to be productive. There are still distractions to deal with, such as meal trolleys and the other people around you. But your commitment and responsibility to them is completely different to those around you at home or in the office. These distractions are much easier to ignore.

But you can’t just hop on the plane and expect to work productively. You need to be prepared, and undertake a little bit of planning before you go.

Here are some steps you can take to give yourself the best chance of making the most of your in-flight time.

Book an aisle seat

Most people have a definite preference for where they want to sit on the plane. But if you want to work on the flight, I find an aisle seat works best. You’ll be awake for long periods, and as you’ll see from points below, being able to move about will be important for staying focused on the task at hand.

Have a plan before you go

A week or so before the flight, plan out the work you’ll do on the plane. Start getting together all the notes, documents and spreadsheets you’ll need to complete the work. Remember, you may not be able to get online.

I’ve found planes to be perfect for both creative and planning work. On flights I’ve completed:

Blog content plans. Creating a yearly content plan for your blog takes hours, and being able to focus on it for several hours without interruption has huge benefits. You can take a top-level view of the content over the year, and then narrow down to topics by quarter, month and week. Creating topics is taxing work for the brain, and a natural reaction is to switch to an easier task when you start to run out of ideas. But if you push through the resistance because you’re stuck in your seat, you force your mind to become more creative and think beyond surface-level ideas. And that can help you come up with some very unique and creative blog post ideas. Online course content outlines. Creating an online course can be broken down into many mini projects, including creating the course outline. Working without distractions or the internet means you can’t escape the task by doing more “research”. Chances are you already know everything you need to put the course outline together. You just need to focus and stick with it. And a long plane flight can be perfect for that. Rest first if you need to

A lot of people wake up early to catch a flight, or stay up late the night before the flight getting everything ready their trip. Either way, you can find yourself sitting in your plane seat feeling very tired.

If you have a long flight ahead of you, take a nap before you start working. It can be tempting to do it the other way round. “I’ll get through the work quickly, and then I can nap as long as I like.”

However, the reality is your productivity decreases in proportion to how tired you are.

Concentration, working memory, mathematical capacity, and logical reasoning are all aspects of cognitive function compromised by sleep deprivation. {source}

You’ll get less work done than you normally would, and the work you do get done probably won’t be  as good. So recharge your batteries before you get started.

Have all the tech gadgets you need

Write a list of all the tech gadgets you’ll need to work productively on the plane. As we tend to be using them until the moment we leave for the airport, it’s easy to leave them behind. Make sure they’re fully charged before you leave, and double check your list to make sure you’ve packed everything, including headphones, battery packs, charger cords, etc.

It’s important to know the battery life of the devices you’ll be using, and what (if any) charging facilities are available on your flight. For instance, while most planes have chargers for phones/tablets on the back of chairs, very few will have a way for you to charge your computer. This information can help you plan out what work you’ll do on what device. For example, I could write a short document on Google Docs offline or a blog post on my phone. But I struggle with anything more detailed than that, and so I  save the battery on the computer for more complicated work.

Go without wifi on the plane

Some flights now offer wifi, either for free or for a fee. I highly recommend not connecting to the wifi. Chances are you’ve created an out of office reply to let people know you won’t be answering your emails. Take this opportunity to disconnect and do some creative/complex work without interruption.

Take breaks

Just as you would when working in your office, make sure you take regular breaks and get out of your seat. I’ve yet to see a plane that lets you work in an ergonomic position, so you need regular movement to offset it, not to mention the potential issues with deep vein thrombosis on long-haul flights.

It may feel a little weird, but you can do some mini exercises at the back of the plane—calf stretches, twists to get some movement in your back and arms, etc. This post lists seven exercises (with pictures) that you can do on a plane. Movement like this will help invigorate you and give you more energy. The break from focusing also gives your brain a rest so you can let it recharge a little before you get back to work.

Load up your devices

Is there an online course you signed up to but are yet to complete? Many courses let you download the materials onto your computer, which means you can finally start the course that will help you in the next step of your business while flying to your destination.

You probably have loads of books and podcasts you want to listen to. Load up your devices in advance, and create a list of what you’ll listen to. Prioritise them according to how they’ll will help you with your blogging goal for the year. And don’t just listen passively. Take notes on what actions you can take once you’re off the plane.

Take along pen and paper

While some of you happily take notes on your device, pen and paper can also be a great option on the plane. You can map out your notes and your next action steps. It’s also useful to have pen and paper in case technology fails you. While it may be a little slower and require typing up later, you can still plan and create on pen and paper if the battery in your computer has run out of charge.

Drink and eat well

To work productively, it’s important to eat and drink well. Skip the free alcohol, and have extra water instead. It’s easy to become dehydrated on long flights, so making sure you drink plenty of water is important. Hence my first point about making sure you get an aisle seat. It gives you easier access to the toilet, which you’ll need when you drink more water 🙂 .

Consider taking some snacks with you on the plane, or even meals. Your brain uses more energy than any other human organ, so it’s important to keep it well fuelled on long-haul flights so you can work as productively as possible.

What other tips would you add to help bloggers work productively on flights?

Photo by Bambi Corro on Unsplash

The post How to Work Productively on a Plane appeared first on ProBlogger.

      


How to Work Productively on a Plane

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/8Fa3S5wiQ7o/

How to work productively when flying

If I look back at the key products and services I’ve created, they’ve all been influenced by productive groundwork done while travelling. Australia is a long way from most places, so when travelling to places like the USA, there are plenty of hours on the plane that can be filled with deep work.

I realise not everyone will want to spend time working as they travel. But it can be a super effective way to be productive. There are still distractions to deal with, such as meal trolleys and the other people around you. But your commitment and responsibility to them is completely different to those around you at home or in the office. These distractions are much easier to ignore.

But you can’t just hop on the plane and expect to work productively. You need to be prepared, and undertake a little bit of planning before you go.

Here are some steps you can take to give yourself the best chance of making the most of your in-flight time.

Book an aisle seat

Most people have a definite preference for where they want to sit on the plane. But if you want to work on the flight, I find an aisle seat works best. You’ll be awake for long periods, and as you’ll see from points below, being able to move about will be important for staying focused on the task at hand.

Have a plan before you go

A week or so before the flight, plan out the work you’ll do on the plane. Start getting together all the notes, documents and spreadsheets you’ll need to complete the work. Remember, you may not be able to get online.

I’ve found planes to be perfect for both creative and planning work. On flights I’ve completed:

Blog content plans. Creating a yearly content plan for your blog takes hours, and being able to focus on it for several hours without interruption has huge benefits. You can take a top-level view of the content over the year, and then narrow down to topics by quarter, month and week. Creating topics is taxing work for the brain, and a natural reaction is to switch to an easier task when you start to run out of ideas. But if you push through the resistance because you’re stuck in your seat, you force your mind to become more creative and think beyond surface-level ideas. And that can help you come up with some very unique and creative blog post ideas. Online course content outlines. Creating an online course can be broken down into many mini projects, including creating the course outline. Working without distractions or the internet means you can’t escape the task by doing more “research”. Chances are you already know everything you need to put the course outline together. You just need to focus and stick with it. And a long plane flight can be perfect for that. Rest first if you need to

A lot of people wake up early to catch a flight, or stay up late the night before the flight getting everything ready their trip. Either way, you can find yourself sitting in your plane seat feeling very tired.

If you have a long flight ahead of you, take a nap before you start working. It can be tempting to do it the other way round. “I’ll get through the work quickly, and then I can nap as long as I like.”

However, the reality is your productivity decreases in proportion to how tired you are.

Concentration, working memory, mathematical capacity, and logical reasoning are all aspects of cognitive function compromised by sleep deprivation. {source}

You’ll get less work done than you normally would, and the work you do get done probably won’t be  as good. So recharge your batteries before you get started.

Have all the tech gadgets you need

Write a list of all the tech gadgets you’ll need to work productively on the plane. As we tend to be using them until the moment we leave for the airport, it’s easy to leave them behind. Make sure they’re fully charged before you leave, and double check your list to make sure you’ve packed everything, including headphones, battery packs, charger cords, etc.

It’s important to know the battery life of the devices you’ll be using, and what (if any) charging facilities are available on your flight. For instance, while most planes have chargers for phones/tablets on the back of chairs, very few will have a way for you to charge your computer. This information can help you plan out what work you’ll do on what device. For example, I could write a short document on Google Docs offline or a blog post on my phone. But I struggle with anything more detailed than that, and so I  save the battery on the computer for more complicated work.

Go without wifi on the plane

Some flights now offer wifi, either for free or for a fee. I highly recommend not connecting to the wifi. Chances are you’ve created an out of office reply to let people know you won’t be answering your emails. Take this opportunity to disconnect and do some creative/complex work without interruption.

Take breaks

Just as you would when working in your office, make sure you take regular breaks and get out of your seat. I’ve yet to see a plane that lets you work in an ergonomic position, so you need regular movement to offset it, not to mention the potential issues with deep vein thrombosis on long-haul flights.

It may feel a little weird, but you can do some mini exercises at the back of the plane—calf stretches, twists to get some movement in your back and arms, etc. This post lists seven exercises (with pictures) that you can do on a plane. Movement like this will help invigorate you and give you more energy. The break from focusing also gives your brain a rest so you can let it recharge a little before you get back to work.

Load up your devices

Is there an online course you signed up to but are yet to complete? Many courses let you download the materials onto your computer, which means you can finally start the course that will help you in the next step of your business while flying to your destination.

You probably have loads of books and podcasts you want to listen to. Load up your devices in advance, and create a list of what you’ll listen to. Prioritise them according to how they’ll will help you with your blogging goal for the year. And don’t just listen passively. Take notes on what actions you can take once you’re off the plane.

Take along pen and paper

While some of you happily take notes on your device, pen and paper can also be a great option on the plane. You can map out your notes and your next action steps. It’s also useful to have pen and paper in case technology fails you. While it may be a little slower and require typing up later, you can still plan and create on pen and paper if the battery in your computer has run out of charge.

Drink and eat well

To work productively, it’s important to eat and drink well. Skip the free alcohol, and have extra water instead. It’s easy to become dehydrated on long flights, so making sure you drink plenty of water is important. Hence my first point about making sure you get an aisle seat. It gives you easier access to the toilet, which you’ll need when you drink more water 🙂 .

Consider taking some snacks with you on the plane, or even meals. Your brain uses more energy than any other human organ, so it’s important to keep it well fuelled on long-haul flights so you can work as productively as possible.

What other tips would you add to help bloggers work productively on flights?

Photo by Bambi Corro on Unsplash

The post How to Work Productively on a Plane appeared first on ProBlogger.

      


The Top 25 Costliest Keywords in South Africa

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WordStreamBlog/~3/f2dH_C8fIKE/most-expensive-keywords-south-africa

As WordStream’s website manager, I occasionally stumble upon forgotten web pages crafted in the days of yore. For example: I recently read this one from 2009, where Elisa told us Google Wave might just be the next big thing. Our readers probably have a similar feeling of nostalgia when they find our original Most Expensive Keywords post from 2011 (“Insurance keywords at only $25 per click? Those were the days!”)

As you might have guessed, the paid search landscape has changed just a little, teensy bit since 2011. So have we: our product and free tools are light years ahead of where we were then, and it was high time to update our Most Expensive Keywords data.

This time, not only did we update the data, but we created currency-specific iterations of the infographic. They each have their charms: I’ve learned a lot about gambling in Great Britain and the litigiousness of our Australian friends.

Today, we’re bringing you the Top 25 Costliest Keywords, South Africa Edition!

South African Keyword Cost

While there’s some overlap between the ZAR dataset and our other datasets (USA, Canada, United Kingdom, and Australia), there are a few significant differences. Though business services, software, loans, and finance all broke into the top 25, the “money category” (as Allen called it) was much smaller and lower on the list than in other countries.

Car insurance takes the cake

Insurance was the most expensive category in ZAR, by far. Car insurance was particularly prevalent in this data set, which included branded searches for Hippo Insurance (a popular South African insurer.) Interestingly, car insurance isn’t compulsory in South Africa, as it is in many other nations. (Norway, the UK, and the US all legally require drivers to carry third-party insurance.) Some statistics indicate that the majority of cars in South Africa—up to 65%—are uninsured, which means the cost of a vehicle crash could be alarmingly high for all parties involved.

…But you might not have that car for long

Pawn services came in at #12 on our list, at an average of R24.77/click. Interestingly enough for this bike-riding writer, people were almost as eager to pawn their cars as they were to insure them. Many of the keywords in the “pawn services” category dealt with cars – including “pawn and drive,” “pawn my car,” and “pawn my car title.”

Moving

South Africa was the only region where “moving” was on the list – and it came in quite high, at #4! Popular keywords in this category were focused around home moves, particularly in Durban, South Africa’s third-largest city in the province of KwaZulu Natal. The province as a whole had the highest estimated inward migration of any province in South Africa over the past 5 years (2011-2016 saw an influx of 1.1m in-migrants) – keeping movers busy!

Costly Keywords in South Africa 

Beautiful downtown Durban

Image-conscious categories: Jewelry, Health & Fitness, Cosmetics, and Decorations

The categories that rounded out the last 20% of the list were largely image-focused: jewelry, health & fitness, cosmetics, and decorations! In the “decorations” category, South Africans were searching for flags and banners of all shapes and materials – feather banners, outdoor banners, popup banners, and teardrop banners!

Perhaps you’re getting ready to celebrate a spate of engagements – the jewelry category was full of searches for diamond rings, wedding rings, and engagement rings. Luckily, your wedding guests are going to look fit & gorgeous – we saw lots of searches for skin creams, hair salons, and treadmills and home exercise equipment. I’m sitting at my desk full of FOMO thinking about all the fun South African parties I’m missing out on.

South African Keyword Cost

Is there anything else that stood out to you? Let us know in the comments!

There’s more where this came from:

Most Expensive Keywords in the USA

Most Expensive Keywords in the United Kingdom

Most Expensive Keywords in Australia

About the data:

Here’s how we got the list: We pulled all the data collected from anonymous AdWords Performance Grader reports across all industries between June 1, 2016 and June 12, 2017, then looked at the top 1000 most expensive keywords seen during that time period and categorized them by core intent.

For example, we lumped the keywords “fitness course” and “personal trainer” into a single category since the core intent is the same. Likewise, keywords involving different types of lawyers (which happens to be the most expensive grouping in our AUD data set) or insurance were grouped together. We used a similar methodology when we created our first “Most Expensive Keywords” infographic back in 2011 so as to avoid featuring too many specific long-tail or local keywords that wouldn’t have broad applicability to a large number of businesses. We separated distinct services (pest control vs. termites) as much as possible.

We also filtered out keywords with less than 100 clicks from our data set. We only looked at advertisers bidding in USD, AUD, CAD, and ZAR, and analyzed different currencies separately. We also eliminated non-English ads and duplicates (where both the keyword and the CPC were exactly the same) from that set. The results you’re reading about in this article are in ZAR.

(Thank you to everyone who helped compile, analyze, and illustrate the data, including our data analyst Josh Brackett and our designer Kate Lindsay!)


7 Advanced Google Shopping Strategies [Infographic]

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/WordStreamBlog/~3/PsuzJ_xREEk/google-shopping-infographic

Competing in Google Shopping is hard.

google shopping tips because its harder than search

If you want to succeed as a retailer a successful strategy is essential, especially when you consider the fact that 56% of Google PPC budget is spent on shopping. That’s right: In the USA, Shopping is more popular than search.

To help you get the most out of Google Shopping, our friends at London-based digital marketing agency Clicteq have put together an infographic outlining some advanced techniques that advertisers can leverage to find success in the highly competitive world of eCommerce.

The 7 advanced strategies for Google Shopping success include:

Segment campaigns based on intention Keep pricing competitive Test bids extensively Add keywords to product titles Segment by product ID Use dayparting Add RLSA to Shopping campaigns

With that, the infographic!

 7 advanced google shopping strategies infographic clicteq

As the infographic suggests, Google Shopping can be a tangled web, a place where finding success (measured in ROI) is anything but easy.

Doing so starts with segmentation. By breaking products out based on their Item ID, you can take control of your search queries and product bid. Creating separate campaigns for different types of searchers means you can bid differently for branded vs non-branded terms, limiting wasted spend.

Google’s emphasis on pricing—particularly ensuring that your pricing is competitive relative to other advertisers—is a key component of success: if your goods are overpriced, conversions volume can decrease by over 60%. In a similar vein, bidding mechanics are hyper sensitive on Google Shopping compared to Google Search. A small change, even just a few cents, has the potential to double or half your revenue: talk about volatility. 

The message from Google, at least when it comes to Shopping, is clear: if you want more, better impressions for a certain product, you need to strike the perfect balance between keyword implementation (using search queries in your product headlines is a great place to start) and bidding.

Doing so will pay dividends, especially when you consider that on Google Shopping conversion rates change hourly: your bids should do the same. Advertisers who use historical data to adjust their bids on a daily or even hourly basis see an average increase in conversion volume of 11%. And it gets even better: by using RLSA to apply remarketing lists to your shopping ads you can expect to see significant increases in CTR and conversion rate for pre-qualified audiences.

This infographic was originally published on and re-posted here with permission from clicteq.com.

About the Author

Wesley Parker is Founder and CEO at Clicteq. He currently manages an AdWords portfolio across a range of different sectors. His writing is regularly featured in leading search publications such as Search Engine Journal, Search Engine Watch, and Econsultancy.


187: Is Written Content Dead?

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/VIQjYmxl_6c/problogger

What the Future Looks Like for Written Content

In today’s lesson, I want to talk to you about written content vs other mediums and respond to a few questions I’ve been getting lately about which medium is best to focus upon and to answer the question – is the future of written content dead!

Listen to this episode in the player above or here on iTunes (look for episode 187).

Events:

Before I get into today’s show though I’ve been hinting for a few episodes now that I’ll have some news for you about this year’s ProBlogger events in Australia and the USA – and how you can get early bird tickets to both.

Today I’m pleased to announce what we’re doing:

In Australia – we’re running two events. We’ve got Pat Flynn coming out to speak in both Brisbane and Melbourne on two consecutive weeks. Brisbane is 29-30 July and Melbourne is 5-6 August.

There’s two options with tickets in both cities. On the Saturdays we’ll be doing a larger single stream day with 7 sessions. Pat, myself and some other special guests will be teaching on how to monetize blogs. We’ll be talking monetization models, content, traffic, engagement and conversion.

On the Sundays there’s an option to upgrade your ticket to come to a mastermind day. These will be much smaller (32 people) and give you an opportunity to really drill down into your own blog and business and to talk with both Pat, myself and some other experience bloggers to brainstorm, strategize and plan how to grow your business.

These two Aussie events are already selling quickly – the Melbourne mastermind is already sold out but there are tickets as I record this for day 1 in Melbourne and both day 1 and the mastermind in Brisbane.

Check out the Aussie event at problogger.com/events, where for the next week or so you can save $100 when you get an Early Bird Ticket.

If you’re in the US, I am co-presenting/hosting an event in Dallas on 24-25 October. I’m doing this in partnership with the Digital CoLab and we’re calling it the Success Incubator.

This event will be a combination of very practical/actionable teaching but also a chance to really drill down and mastermind/discuss your business in round table sessions.

We’ll be announcing more details about speakers and agenda in the coming weeks but have put tickets on sale for those of you who are keen. We have a limited number of tickets and they’re already selling fast. You can see what we’re planning and grab your ticket at:

problogger.com/success, where there’s currently an Early Bird ticket available that saves you $50.

OK – that’s enough about our events – let’s get into today’s show where we’re going to talk about the place of written content in blogging today.

Mentioned in todays episode – A series by Colin Gray on Content Stacking.

Full Transcript Expand to view full transcript Compress to smaller transcript view Hey there and welcome to episode 187 of the ProBlogger podcast. My name is Darren Rowse and I’m the blogger behind the ProBlogger.com – blog, podcast, event, job board and series of eBooks all designed to help you, as a blogger, to grow your audience, but first, to start you blog, to grow your audience and then to create some amazing content that’s going to help people to improve their lives in some way. This is going to make the world better but also, hopefully, be sustainable for you to build some profit into your blog. You can learn more about ProBlogger and all that we do over at ProBlogger.com.

In today’s lesson, I want to talk to you about written content versus other mediums, other types of content. I want to respond to a few questions that I’ve been getting lately about which medium is best to focus upon and if there’s any future in the written word. Is the future of the written content dead? That’s the question I had a few times at Social Media Marketing World last week. I want to address in today’s podcast.

You can find today show notes where I’ll have some further listening and further reading over at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187.

Before I get into today’s show, I have been hinting over the last few episodes that I’ll have some news for you about this year’s ProBlogger event in Australia and the USA, and how you can get some early bird tickets to both those. Today, I’m pleased to announce what we’re doing. I’m going to give you some further reading if you are interested, over in the show notes. But if you’re in Australia, we’re running two events this year. We’ve got Pat Flynn coming out to speak from Smart Passive Income. He’s coming out to Brisbane and Melbourne on consecutive weeks. Brisbane is the 29th and 30th of July and Melbourne is the 5th and 6th of August.

There are two options for tickets in both of those cities as well. We’re doing two-day events as you know. The first day, in both cities is a larger single stream day with a seven sessions. Pat, myself and some other special guest will be teaching you on the topic of monetizing blogs. We’re going to be specifically talking about the different models that you can do, content tips and traffic tips, some engagement tips and a little bit about conversion, making the money from all that stuff. That’s the first day. It’s everyone in the same room. We’ll have 100 plus people in on that day, potentially even more.

On the Sunday, the second day, there’s an option to upgrade your ticket to come to a mastermind day. Again, these will be with Pat, myself, and some other experienced blogger. It’s going to be limited to 32 people for that second day. We’ll give an opportunity to really drill down into your blog, into your business, to talk to Pat, myself and some of these other experts that were bringing in to strategize, to plan and to really brainstorm what it is that you need to do to grow your business, much more intimate kind of thing.

Those two cities, Melbourne and Brisbane, that’s the format. We’ll do the same thing in both events with slightly different speakers in addition to Pat and myself. I have to say the Melbourne mastermind is already sold out. It’s sold out in the few hours when we launched it. As I record this, there’s still a few tickets left for the mastermind in Brisbane and then there are plenty of tickets for day one of both of those events. We should be able to accommodate most people who want to come to those first days.

If you’re in Australia, check out ProBlogger.com/events and for the next week or so you get $100 early bird discount on both tickets there.

If you’re in the US, as I know about half of our listeners are. I’m co presenting or co hosting an event in Dallas, in October. It’s the 24th and 25th of October. It’s in partnership with some friends of mine called the Digital CoLab and we’re calling the event that’s partnership of both of our different businesses, we’re calling it the Success Incubator. I’ve got some link for you on that as well if you go to ProBlogger.com/success.

ProBlogger.com/success, there’s a $50 discount at present for early birds.

That event is going to be a combination of some practical, actionable teaching but also some mastermind type of experiences as well. We will be giving you a bit more information on that in the next few weeks but at the moment, you can get that early bird offer. Again, if you’re in Australia, ProBlogger.com/events. If you’re in America, ProBlogger.com/success.

That’s all I got to say on the events, I would love to see you there. It’s the whole out of my year doing this events. It’s probably the best thing that I think I do. If you get some value from this podcast, you’re going to love what we do at those events because it’s very similar. I’m trying to do practical, actionable stuff that you’re going to get a lot of value at. Some of my best online friends will be there to deliver that value as well in addition to what I’ve got to present.

That’s enough of the events. You can find today show notes over at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187 where I’ll link to both of those event types as well.

That’s the longest introduction I have ever done. I’m not going to do that in every show, that’s for sure but I want to get onto today’s show. We’re going to talk about written content.

Just a little word of warning, I’m completely jet lagged out of my head. I got back from Social Media Marketing World a couple of days ago in San Diego, 25 hours both ways. Those of you who were in the Facebook group, who know that I, pretty much, every time I had a layover, I answered questions in the group. I want to thank those of you who kept me company over that particular trip. That was a crazy trip. I’m pretty tired but I want to get into today show, we’re talking about written content.

The reason that I want to talk about it is because at Social Media Marketing World, I recon I had about 10 conversations with people about written content and whether it has a future. People are coming out and going, is written content dead? Everyone at Social Media Marketing World is talking about video. There were whole streams about podcasts. There were lots of streams about visual content. In a lot of our sessions on written content, people were saying, “Is it dead? Is there a future in it?” That’s why I want to talk about it today.

To do so, I want to rewind the clock back to 2002, in my first blog. While it’s the first blog, it was called Living Room, it’s not online anymore the other day, I was actually looking back as part of my preparation for my talk at Social Media Marketing World. I went onto one of my favorite tools, the Internet Archive, which is a tool that records what sites you used to look like in the past. It’s actually recording what it looks like every few months. Once you’re site’s in there, it will continue to grab what things look like on your site right now.

I went back as far as I could on the Internet Archive to find what my blog look like, that first original blog looked like. I got to it eventually when I remembered what the URL was because it was on Blogspot when I first had it. As I was looking at it, I found myself really cringing. Probably because of the horrible design, I hacked it together myself. I’m not a designer at all. Back then I was even less of a designer. I also cringed at the spelling mistakes and some of the naivety of what I was doing on the blog at the time.

As I was looking at it, I was amazed by a couple of things. The main thing that I was amazed about was the complete lack of visual content on that blog. The front page had 10 posts on it and not a single one of them had anything other than text. The only visuals on the front page of my blog were a tiny little series of 100×100 pixels that I put in the header of my design, these tiny little images which, if memory serves me correctly, took me days to get those images right up there in the design. That was the only visual on the whole site. Every blog post I had was text and it really, to me, stood out as being very different to what my blogs look like today. If you go to my blogs today, ProBlogger for instance, you’ll see there’s video on the front page and on key pages around the site. Every single post has images. There’s obviously a podcast on there as well. It’s a much more of a multimedia experience.

Back then in 2002, I didn’t use images or any other mediums at all for a number of reasons. Firstly, people just didn’t do that back then. I do remember a few bloggers who were doing visual stuff but really not many at all. Most bloggers that I was reading were doing purely text as well. Dial up internet, that’s what I was on at that time in 2002. That made it hard to upload images. I remember trying to upload an image at one stage, even those 100×100 pixels, it was really slow to get them up there. Any time that I did start to do images, I would get pushed back from my readers because some of my readers were on dial up as well. I really didn’t like it when I did use images. I don’t know if you remember those days when you would load up a website with images on it and the images would load line by line, a big image would take 5 to 10 minutes to see images. I guess the other reason that people weren’t doing multimedia, video and audio in particular, was that the tools to do that were pretty primitive. This is pre-YouTube, this is pre-iTunes. The tools to make that topic content were pretty primitive as well.

It was possible to do it but it was pretty hard to do. Things have changed a lot since 2002 when I started blogging. Today, not a blog post goes by on my blog where there’s not at least a single image. That’s a rule I have. We have to have an image in every post. Of course, I’m doing a weekly podcast. We’re doing live videos over on Facebook and embedding some of those into content on the blogs as well, playing with different types of mediums, some infographics and other visual content as well.

The web today is just so much more visual and the tools at our fingertips are so powerful. The fact that I can get my phone now and go live on Facebook is just amazing, so much easier to create content, to edit that content today. There’s this expectation amongst our readers today that if content isn’t at the very least visual, then it’s often seen as second right. As a result, we’re seeing a lot more bloggers shifting their attention to audio, to visual, to live content and visual content as well. As a result, I’m starting to see some of my friends shift away or at least decreasing their reliance on the written word.

Hence, the question I’ve been getting this year at Social Media Marketing World. Is the future of text, of written content gloomy? Is written content dead?

I don’t think it is. I really don’t think it is. What I think has been happening over the last five years is a needed realignment to get the balance right between the different mediums. If we look over the last few decades of mainstream media, even before the rise of the internet, we’ve always seen room for text, newspapers, magazines in largely a textual content with images as well, I guess. We’ve always had, over the last few decades, room for audio radio, we’ve always had room for video over the last few decades at least, with television, movies whether that be live television or recorded televisions.

As we look back in history, we’ve always had these types of content sitting side by side, at least over the last few decades since television came out. We’ve always had them sitting side by side but there had been periods of time where certain mediums have dominated. We’ve seen the rise and fall of different mediums. None of them have ever completely died, often. Over the last decade, we’ve seen of course a massive shift to the internet. Now, it’s so much easier to produce all of these different types of content on the internet. In comparison to 2002, it’s so much easier to do video. I think what’s been happening as we’ve seen the rise of audio and particularly the rise of video is just a realignment. I actually think it’s going to balance out and we will see a place in another few years where these three different types of content or four different types if you include visual sort of sit side by side.

At the moment, it does seem like video is everything. We’re saying Facebook, putting a lot of time in the video as well. But I think things will balance out again particularly with the web getting faster and faster and more and more of the world getting access to fast internet. We’re going to see things continue rise perhaps for audio and video for the next little while, but written content is not going away.

I actually think, at the moment, written content is still, the dominant or at least in the top two types of content that people are consuming online today. Yes, we have seen the rise in video but I think written content is still perhaps the most popular, if not, the second most popular.

There’s a few reasons that I will give you that I don’t think written content is going away. For me, the main reason for this is that some people simply prefer written content to anything else. I saw this when I launched these podcast. When I launched these podcast, I was really excited about it. I was really excited about audio because I’m an audio kind of person. I learned best through listening to someone. But when I launched it, I got some really positive feedback. I also got quite a few of my readers who were a bit angry that I was starting to do audio. They pushed back. I got a number of emails in that first week or so and in the weeks afterwards from people saying, “I don’t listen to audio.” When I do the same thing with video, when I do a Facebook Live and I link to it in a newsletter, I get emails from people saying, “I don’t watch video.”

There’s a variety of reasons why they don’t, for some it’s accessibility, they’re on slower internet. Some, it’s they don’t have an iPhone and they don’t know how to listen to the audio or they don’t want to download an app to listen to it or they don’t want to do that and for some people, it’s just a preference. Some people learn best through the written word. That’s why we’ve added transcripts for all of our podcasts but the reality is some people just prefer an article to listening to something or to watching something. This is not going away. The written word is not going away because some people just are going to be searching for that topic content. For me, that’s the number one reason. There are other reasons as well.

For now, the type of content that search engines present most in their results, this is changing a little, is written content. If you do a search for anything in Google on google.com, you will find that Google is presenting a few videos and images to include some visuals in their search results but still, the vast majority of what they’re indexing is text and written content. That might be partly because there’s more written content on the internet than video but Google is still showing more of that, I think it’s another good reason to continue to create written content.

Another reason that I think written content is great is that it’s scannable. Most people can scan an article much quicker than they can watch a video or listen to a podcast. You can speed up YouTube clip, you can double the speed of a YouTube clip. Some of you listen to these podcasts at one and a half times speed or even two times speed but there’s only some file you can speed up listening. It’s very hard to find an exact moment in a podcast. You can’t scan and go, “Yeah that looks interesting, I’m going to just go straight to that.” Same with video unless the creator of that video or audio goes to the effort of marking when things happen, they do timestamps. In most cases, written content, you can take a quick scan and go, “Yeah, I want to read that section.” That’s another advantage of written word.

We’ll see some changes in these, we’ll perhaps see Google indexing video and audio in a better way that helps people to be able to scan it and find the right beat that’s relevant for them but for now, written content is the best in terms of that. Text also allows you to really comprehensively cover an idea. Of course, this can be done in other mediums too but I think people are used to reading those comprehensive pieces of content, at least some people are. I’ve got books that take hours or days to get through. My last holidays, I read a book that took me several days to read, that really long form content people are used to. They have the mindset that they’re willing to really invest time in reading.

In terms of video content, perhaps people aren’t quite as used to that although we’re seeing changes with this. With live streaming, people are now binging on video content a lot more. Things are changing in that regard but I think text does allow you to comprehensively cover an idea in a way that people are used to and willing to invest time into.

Text is still perhaps the most accessible type of content for many people today. In terms of internet speeds, we still see some parts of the world that are on slower internet speeds than others. Text opens up a way of communication with those people. I think text builds credibility, I’m not saying video and audio don’t, but I think it does build credibility. People are impressed by the written word.

Written content is also really easy to create. This is another advantage for the written word, I think. While it’s very easy these days to create and edit video, it does take more work to get that to a final point where you can publish it. It’s something that takes some certain level of technical expertise as compared to written content where you can open up a WordPress document and type it straight in and then you can edit it on there as well. You can even go back and edit it once you’ve already published. I guess that’s the other advantage of text, for me.

In comparison to audio or video, once it’s published, it’s really hard to go back in and then edit it. Sometimes, I’ll be listening to my own podcast and think, “Oh my gosh, I can’t believe I made that mistake.” I could go back and edit it but it would take so much more work than it does to edit a blog post, for example.

There’s a variety of reasons why I don’t think written content is going away either from a consumer standpoint or from a creator standpoint as well. I’m sure other people would give me some other benefits of written content. If you’ve got any, I’d love to hear them in the comments over on the show notes or on the Facebook group.

I do want to say I’m not arguing that it should be the only medium. I’m not arguing that written content is the best medium even, that everyone should be creating it even. I just want to emphasize that I don’t think it’s going away. I see a lot of hype about how video is going to be the only thing that we consume online and I personally don’t see that day coming. I actually, personally think I will always listen to podcast. I prefer audio. There are certain types of content I prefer to read. I don’t have all day to sit and watch videos, to find the snippets that I really need to learn about. I want to be able to scan content. I don’t think written content is going away. I’ve just argued for written. I think there are also some real benefits of having other types of content as well.

I guess the way I look at it is it’s like a tool bell. I want in my online content creation to be able to pull out written content, to be able to produce video, to be able to produce audio, to be able to produce visual content at the right time. Each medium has its strengths. To be able to create them all enables us as communicators, as online entrepreneurs to communicate more effectively at the right time. For example, let’s just go through different types of content. I’ve just argued the case for the written content.

Let’s think about visual content. Visual content is really good today, obviously, it’s a very visual web. But what I found is the visual content helps you to get shared, it helps you to get exposure. It helps you to become known. People share visuals on Pinterest, Instagram, Google Images, help us to become known and found through visual content. Creating visual is really important because it helps us to become more known, it helps us to become shared.

Video is great, also for being found. We’re seeing video coming into the search engine results more and more. But for me, the strength of videos, that helps us to be liked. We talked about visual content helps us to be known. I think video helps us to be liked. It shows who we are. It shows people our expertise. It shows people our sense of humor, our delivery style. It helps us to become liked. It helps us to build credibility. It helps us also to illustrate ideas and processes in a way that text sometimes struggles to do. To be able to show someone this is how I do something, that’s something that you can’t do in text but it’s so much easier sometimes in video. Video is really good in that.

For me, the strength of audio is that it’s incredibly personal. I lost count of the number of times at Social Media Marketing World that people came out to me and said, “You know I feel like I talk to you every week. I feel like we have conversations. I feel like I know you on a deeper level.” There’s something very intimate about putting ear buds in the ears and listening to the voice of someone. It helps people to make a connection with you on a really deeper level. It helps people to build trust with you.

We often talk about people want to know, like and trust you. We want to be known. We want to be liked. We want to be trusted. For me, if you’re using these different types of mediums, it enables you to be known, to be liked and trusted. Particularly, if you bring those different types of medium together.

I guess what I’m trying to say here is there’s real advantages of text but there are also real advantages of these other mediums as well. If possible, gather as many skills as you can in those different areas because there’s something very powerful that happens when you bring those things together.

My friend, Colin Gray, he’s spoke at our Australian event, ProBlogger event last year. He has a blog podcast called The Podcast Host. At last year’s event, in Australia, he talked about something that I’ve never heard anyone talked about before, he called it Content Stacking, Content Stacking as a way to communicate more effectively. He talked about designing a series of content or a season of content that takes people through a number of pieces of content or a number of different types of content. He talked about bringing written word, podcast, video, visual content together to create a stack of content that leads people through a learning process.

Ever since I heard him talking about that, it’s something that I’ve been wanting to do more and more often. I’ll link in the show notes today an article that Colin wrote on that particular topic. In fact, it’s actually a series of articles that he wrote on that topic. I’ve really been digging into that series. On ProBlogger, we’re going to be exploring content stacking a little bit more in the coming months. You’re going to see us roll out some content that is stacked. It will take us a couple of months to get it together but you’re going to see us put together some content that’s written content and audio content and video content and some visual content as well that will walk you through a process over on ProBlogger. It’s something that we’re putting together at the moment. We’ll present almost like a course but I could see it being done on a blog as well. I really encourage you to really grapple with bringing the different types of content together but don’t throw out written content.

Is written content dead? No, way. Keep creating it. There are so many reasons to do it.

Should it be the only type of content you create? This is really going to come down to your goals but I think most bloggers today should be mixing their mediums. They shouldn’t be just creating single medium blogs.

I still think there is a place for single medium blogs. Someone like Seth Godin, is a great example. Seth Godin is a gifted writer. He writes really well and his articles are short and punchy, they’re short but they’re powerful and I think he presents those articles in a really good  way. He’s a gifted writer and so that’s all he does. You go look at his blog, it looks like my blog in 2002. There are no images on it at all. He’s got a bald head and his glasses a part of his brand. But really, vast majority of the content he’s creating is written content.

It can be done that you just focus on one medium. If you are an amazing writer, write. If you are a gifted video maker, go with video. If you’re audio is your skill, be a podcaster. There are no rules. You can focus on one of the mediums but I think most bloggers today are bringing these different types of mediums together but don’t give up on the written word. I guess that’s my message for tonight. Don’t give up on the written word. It still does have a big place on the web today.

If you want to listen to a little bit more, explore some of these things a little bit more, I’ve got two podcast episodes for you to go back and listen to. Firstly episode 97, I talked about embeddable content. I think this is the easiest way to get multimedia onto your blog today. Some of you are listening to this and going, “Yeah, I do written word but I don’t know how to do visuals. I don’t know how to do video. I don’t know how to do audio.” The easiest way to get those different types of mediums onto your blog is to embed content other people have created.

You go to YouTube and find the best video possible. 99% of those videos on YouTube, you can embed onto your blog. That content creators wants you to embed that content on your blog and this is the easiest way to get these different mediums onto your blog alongside that written content you’ve created.

If you want to learn more about embeddable content, go back and listen to episode 97 of the ProBlogger podcast. It’s sitting there on iTunes or you can go over to the show notes as well. I talked about some of the different types content that you can be embedding onto your blog.

The other one that you might want to listen to is episode 134 which is one where I talked about how to choose which social network but also which medium is best for your blog. If you’re just starting out and you want to experiment with adding a different type of medium into your blog but you don’t know whether you should video or you don’t know whether you should do audio or you should do something else, that episode 134 is one that you can go back and listen to. It asks you some questions, it gives you some questions to begin to explore which medium might be best for you.

Hopefully, they’ll help you. That’s episode 97 and episode 134. Otherwise, dig into the archives. There are 186 previous episodes of this podcast. There’s plenty to listen to. Lastly, don’t forget to join the ProBlogger Facebook group. We’ve seen explosion of people joining that group out over the last little while. If you want to find us, I setup a redirect for you to make it easy for you to find, just type into your browser ProBlogger.com/group and you’ll be forwarded straight to that group.

Thanks for listening. I’m looking forward to chatting with you further of the ProBlogger Facebook group or over on the show notes as well. You can find today’s show notes at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187.

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187: Is Written Content Dead?

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/o4xqWHzZ18E/problogger

What the Future Looks Like for Written Content

In today’s lesson, I want to talk to you about written content vs other mediums and respond to a few questions I’ve been getting lately about which medium is best to focus upon and to answer the question – is the future of written content dead!

Events:

Before I get into today’s show though I’ve been hinting for a few episodes now that I’ll have some news for you about this year’s ProBlogger events in Australia and the USA – and how you can get early bird tickets to both.

Today I’m pleased to announce what we’re doing:

In Australia – we’re running two events. We’ve got Pat Flynn coming out to speak in both Brisbane and Melbourne on two consecutive weeks. Brisbane is 29-30 July and Melbourne is 5-6 August.

There’s two options with tickets in both cities. On the Saturdays we’ll be doing a larger single stream day with 7 sessions. Pat, myself and some other special guests will be teaching on how to monetize blogs. We’ll be talking monetization models, content, traffic, engagement and conversion.

On the Sundays there’s an option to upgrade your ticket to come to a mastermind day. These will be much smaller (32 people) and give you an opportunity to really drill down into your own blog and business and to talk with both Pat, myself and some other experience bloggers to brainstorm, strategize and plan how to grow your business.

These two Aussie events are already selling quickly – the Melbourne mastermind is already sold out but there are tickets as I record this for day 1 in Melbourne and both day 1 and the mastermind in Brisbane.

Check out the Aussie event at problogger.com/events, where for the next week or so you can save $100 when you get an Early Bird Ticket.

If you’re in the US, I am co-presenting/hosting an event in Dallas on 24-25 October. I’m doing this in partnership with the Digital CoLab and we’re calling it the Success Incubator.

This event will be a combination of very practical/actionable teaching but also a chance to really drill down and mastermind/discuss your business in round table sessions.

We’ll be announcing more details about speakers and agenda in the coming weeks but have put tickets on sale for those of you who are keen. We have a limited number of tickets and they’re already selling fast. You can see what we’re planning and grab your ticket at:

problogger.com/success, where there’s currently an Early Bird ticket available that saves you $50.

OK – that’s enough about our events – let’s get into today’s show where we’re going to talk about the place of written content in blogging today.

Full Transcript Expand to view full transcript Compress to smaller transcript view Hey there and welcome to episode 187 of the ProBlogger podcast. My name is Darren Rowse and I’m the blogger behind the ProBlogger.com – blog, podcast, event, job board and series of eBooks all designed to help you, as a blogger, to grow your audience, but first, to start you blog, to grow your audience and then to create some amazing content that’s going to help people to improve their lives in some way. This is going to make the world better but also, hopefully, be sustainable for you to build some profit into your blog. You can learn more about ProBlogger and all that we do over at ProBlogger.com.

In today’s lesson, I want to talk to you about written content versus other mediums, other types of content. I want to respond to a few questions that I’ve been getting lately about which medium is best to focus upon and if there’s any future in the written word. Is the future of the written content dead? That’s the question I had a few times at Social Media Marketing World last week. I want to address in today’s podcast.

You can find today show notes where I’ll have some further listening and further reading over at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187.

Before I get into today’s show, I have been hinting over the last few episodes that I’ll have some news for you about this year’s ProBlogger event in Australia and the USA, and how you can get some early bird tickets to both those. Today, I’m pleased to announce what we’re doing. I’m going to give you some further reading if you are interested, over in the show notes. But if you’re in Australia, we’re running two events this year. We’ve got Pat Flynn coming out to speak from Smart Passive Income. He’s coming out to Brisbane and Melbourne on consecutive weeks. Brisbane is the 29th and 30th of July and Melbourne is the 5th and 6th of August.

There are two options for tickets in both of those cities as well. We’re doing two-day events as you know. The first day, in both cities is a larger single stream day with a seven sessions. Pat, myself and some other special guest will be teaching you on the topic of monetizing blogs. We’re going to be specifically talking about the different models that you can do, content tips and traffic tips, some engagement tips and a little bit about conversion, making the money from all that stuff. That’s the first day. It’s everyone in the same room. We’ll have 100 plus people in on that day, potentially even more.

On the Sunday, the second day, there’s an option to upgrade your ticket to come to a mastermind day. Again, these will be with Pat, myself, and some other experienced blogger. It’s going to be limited to 32 people for that second day. We’ll give an opportunity to really drill down into your blog, into your business, to talk to Pat, myself and some of these other experts that were bringing in to strategize, to plan and to really brainstorm what it is that you need to do to grow your business, much more intimate kind of thing.

Those two cities, Melbourne and Brisbane, that’s the format. We’ll do the same thing in both events with slightly different speakers in addition to Pat and myself. I have to say the Melbourne mastermind is already sold out. It’s sold out in the few hours when we launched it. As I record this, there’s still a few tickets left for the mastermind in Brisbane and then there are plenty of tickets for day one of both of those events. We should be able to accommodate most people who want to come to those first days.

If you’re in Australia, check out ProBlogger.com/events and for the next week or so you get $100 early bird discount on both tickets there.

If you’re in the US, as I know about half of our listeners are. I’m co presenting or co hosting an event in Dallas, in October. It’s the 24th and 25th of October. It’s in partnership with some friends of mine called the Digital CoLab and we’re calling the event that’s partnership of both of our different businesses, we’re calling it the Success Incubator. I’ve got some link for you on that as well if you go to ProBlogger.com/success.

ProBlogger.com/success, there’s a $50 discount at present for early birds.

That event is going to be a combination of some practical, actionable teaching but also some mastermind type of experiences as well. We will be giving you a bit more information on that in the next few weeks but at the moment, you can get that early bird offer. Again, if you’re in Australia, ProBlogger.com/events. If you’re in America, ProBlogger.com/success.

That’s all I got to say on the events, I would love to see you there. It’s the whole out of my year doing this events. It’s probably the best thing that I think I do. If you get some value from this podcast, you’re going to love what we do at those events because it’s very similar. I’m trying to do practical, actionable stuff that you’re going to get a lot of value at. Some of my best online friends will be there to deliver that value as well in addition to what I’ve got to present.

That’s enough of the events. You can find today show notes over at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187 where I’ll link to both of those event types as well.

That’s the longest introduction I have ever done. I’m not going to do that in every show, that’s for sure but I want to get onto today’s show. We’re going to talk about written content.

Just a little word of warning, I’m completely jet lagged out of my head. I got back from Social Media Marketing World a couple of days ago in San Diego, 25 hours both ways. Those of you who were in the Facebook group, who know that I, pretty much, every time I had a layover, I answered questions in the group. I want to thank those of you who kept me company over that particular trip. That was a crazy trip. I’m pretty tired but I want to get into today show, we’re talking about written content.

The reason that I want to talk about it is because at Social Media Marketing World, I recon I had about 10 conversations with people about written content and whether it has a future. People are coming out and going, is written content dead? Everyone at Social Media Marketing World is talking about video. There were whole streams about podcasts. There were lots of streams about visual content. In a lot of our sessions on written content, people were saying, “Is it dead? Is there a future in it?” That’s why I want to talk about it today.

To do so, I want to rewind the clock back to 2002, in my first blog. While it’s the first blog, it was called Living Room, it’s not online anymore the other day, I was actually looking back as part of my preparation for my talk at Social Media Marketing World. I went onto one of my favorite tools, the Internet Archive, which is a tool that records what sites you used to look like in the past. It’s actually recording what it looks like every few months. Once you’re site’s in there, it will continue to grab what things look like on your site right now.

I went back as far as I could on the Internet Archive to find what my blog look like, that first original blog looked like. I got to it eventually when I remembered what the URL was because it was on Blogspot when I first had it. As I was looking at it, I found myself really cringing. Probably because of the horrible design, I hacked it together myself. I’m not a designer at all. Back then I was even less of a designer. I also cringed at the spelling mistakes and some of the naivety of what I was doing on the blog at the time.

As I was looking at it, I was amazed by a couple of things. The main thing that I was amazed about was the complete lack of visual content on that blog. The front page had 10 posts on it and not a single one of them had anything other than text. The only visuals on the front page of my blog were a tiny little series of 100×100 pixels that I put in the header of my design, these tiny little images which, if memory serves me correctly, took me days to get those images right up there in the design. That was the only visual on the whole site. Every blog post I had was text and it really, to me, stood out as being very different to what my blogs look like today. If you go to my blogs today, ProBlogger for instance, you’ll see there’s video on the front page and on key pages around the site. Every single post has images. There’s obviously a podcast on there as well. It’s a much more of a multimedia experience.

Back then in 2002, I didn’t use images or any other mediums at all for a number of reasons. Firstly, people just didn’t do that back then. I do remember a few bloggers who were doing visual stuff but really not many at all. Most bloggers that I was reading were doing purely text as well. Dial up internet, that’s what I was on at that time in 2002. That made it hard to upload images. I remember trying to upload an image at one stage, even those 100×100 pixels, it was really slow to get them up there. Any time that I did start to do images, I would get pushed back from my readers because some of my readers were on dial up as well. I really didn’t like it when I did use images. I don’t know if you remember those days when you would load up a website with images on it and the images would load line by line, a big image would take 5 to 10 minutes to see images. I guess the other reason that people weren’t doing multimedia, video and audio in particular, was that the tools to do that were pretty primitive. This is pre-YouTube, this is pre-iTunes. The tools to make that topic content were pretty primitive as well.

It was possible to do it but it was pretty hard to do. Things have changed a lot since 2002 when I started blogging. Today, not a blog post goes by on my blog where there’s not at least a single image. That’s a rule I have. We have to have an image in every post. Of course, I’m doing a weekly podcast. We’re doing live videos over on Facebook and embedding some of those into content on the blogs as well, playing with different types of mediums, some infographics and other visual content as well.

The web today is just so much more visual and the tools at our fingertips are so powerful. The fact that I can get my phone now and go live on Facebook is just amazing, so much easier to create content, to edit that content today. There’s this expectation amongst our readers today that if content isn’t at the very least visual, then it’s often seen as second right. As a result, we’re seeing a lot more bloggers shifting their attention to audio, to visual, to live content and visual content as well. As a result, I’m starting to see some of my friends shift away or at least decreasing their reliance on the written word.

Hence, the question I’ve been getting this year at Social Media Marketing World. Is the future of text, of written content gloomy? Is written content dead?

I don’t think it is. I really don’t think it is. What I think has been happening over the last five years is a needed realignment to get the balance right between the different mediums. If we look over the last few decades of mainstream media, even before the rise of the internet, we’ve always seen room for text, newspapers, magazines in largely a textual content with images as well, I guess. We’ve always had, over the last few decades, room for audio radio, we’ve always had room for video over the last few decades at least, with television, movies whether that be live television or recorded televisions.

As we look back in history, we’ve always had these types of content sitting side by side, at least over the last few decades since television came out. We’ve always had them sitting side by side but there had been periods of time where certain mediums have dominated. We’ve seen the rise and fall of different mediums. None of them have ever completely died, often. Over the last decade, we’ve seen of course a massive shift to the internet. Now, it’s so much easier to produce all of these different types of content on the internet. In comparison to 2002, it’s so much easier to do video. I think what’s been happening as we’ve seen the rise of audio and particularly the rise of video is just a realignment. I actually think it’s going to balance out and we will see a place in another few years where these three different types of content or four different types if you include visual sort of sit side by side.

At the moment, it does seem like video is everything. We’re saying Facebook, putting a lot of time in the video as well. But I think things will balance out again particularly with the web getting faster and faster and more and more of the world getting access to fast internet. We’re going to see things continue rise perhaps for audio and video for the next little while, but written content is not going away.

I actually think, at the moment, written content is still, the dominant or at least in the top two types of content that people are consuming online today. Yes, we have seen the rise in video but I think written content is still perhaps the most popular, if not, the second most popular.

There’s a few reasons that I will give you that I don’t think written content is going away. For me, the main reason for this is that some people simply prefer written content to anything else. I saw this when I launched these podcast. When I launched these podcast, I was really excited about it. I was really excited about audio because I’m an audio kind of person. I learned best through listening to someone. But when I launched it, I got some really positive feedback. I also got quite a few of my readers who were a bit angry that I was starting to do audio. They pushed back. I got a number of emails in that first week or so and in the weeks afterwards from people saying, “I don’t listen to audio.” When I do the same thing with video, when I do a Facebook Live and I link to it in a newsletter, I get emails from people saying, “I don’t watch video.”

There’s a variety of reasons why they don’t, for some it’s accessibility, they’re on slower internet. Some, it’s they don’t have an iPhone and they don’t know how to listen to the audio or they don’t want to download an app to listen to it or they don’t want to do that and for some people, it’s just a preference. Some people learn best through the written word. That’s why we’ve added transcripts for all of our podcasts but the reality is some people just prefer an article to listening to something or to watching something. This is not going away. The written word is not going away because some people just are going to be searching for that topic content. For me, that’s the number one reason. There are other reasons as well.

For now, the type of content that search engines present most in their results, this is changing a little, is written content. If you do a search for anything in Google on google.com, you will find that Google is presenting a few videos and images to include some visuals in their search results but still, the vast majority of what they’re indexing is text and written content. That might be partly because there’s more written content on the internet than video but Google is still showing more of that, I think it’s another good reason to continue to create written content.

Another reason that I think written content is great is that it’s scannable. Most people can scan an article much quicker than they can watch a video or listen to a podcast. You can speed up YouTube clip, you can double the speed of a YouTube clip. Some of you listen to these podcasts at one and a half times speed or even two times speed but there’s only some file you can speed up listening. It’s very hard to find an exact moment in a podcast. You can’t scan and go, “Yeah that looks interesting, I’m going to just go straight to that.” Same with video unless the creator of that video or audio goes to the effort of marking when things happen, they do timestamps. In most cases, written content, you can take a quick scan and go, “Yeah, I want to read that section.” That’s another advantage of written word.

We’ll see some changes in these, we’ll perhaps see Google indexing video and audio in a better way that helps people to be able to scan it and find the right beat that’s relevant for them but for now, written content is the best in terms of that. Text also allows you to really comprehensively cover an idea. Of course, this can be done in other mediums too but I think people are used to reading those comprehensive pieces of content, at least some people are. I’ve got books that take hours or days to get through. My last holidays, I read a book that took me several days to read, that really long form content people are used to. They have the mindset that they’re willing to really invest time in reading.

In terms of video content, perhaps people aren’t quite as used to that although we’re seeing changes with this. With live streaming, people are now binging on video content a lot more. Things are changing in that regard but I think text does allow you to comprehensively cover an idea in a way that people are used to and willing to invest time into.

Text is still perhaps the most accessible type of content for many people today. In terms of internet speeds, we still see some parts of the world that are on slower internet speeds than others. Text opens up a way of communication with those people. I think text builds credibility, I’m not saying video and audio don’t, but I think it does build credibility. People are impressed by the written word.

Written content is also really easy to create. This is another advantage for the written word, I think. While it’s very easy these days to create and edit video, it does take more work to get that to a final point where you can publish it. It’s something that takes some certain level of technical expertise as compared to written content where you can open up a WordPress document and type it straight in and then you can edit it on there as well. You can even go back and edit it once you’ve already published. I guess that’s the other advantage of text, for me.

In comparison to audio or video, once it’s published, it’s really hard to go back in and then edit it. Sometimes, I’ll be listening to my own podcast and think, “Oh my gosh, I can’t believe I made that mistake.” I could go back and edit it but it would take so much more work than it does to edit a blog post, for example.

There’s a variety of reasons why I don’t think written content is going away either from a consumer standpoint or from a creator standpoint as well. I’m sure other people would give me some other benefits of written content. If you’ve got any, I’d love to hear them in the comments over on the show notes or on the Facebook group.

I do want to say I’m not arguing that it should be the only medium. I’m not arguing that written content is the best medium even, that everyone should be creating it even. I just want to emphasize that I don’t think it’s going away. I see a lot of hype about how video is going to be the only thing that we consume online and I personally don’t see that day coming. I actually, personally think I will always listen to podcast. I prefer audio. There are certain types of content I prefer to read. I don’t have all day to sit and watch videos, to find the snippets that I really need to learn about. I want to be able to scan content. I don’t think written content is going away. I’ve just argued for written. I think there are also some real benefits of having other types of content as well.

I guess the way I look at it is it’s like a tool bell. I want in my online content creation to be able to pull out written content, to be able to produce video, to be able to produce audio, to be able to produce visual content at the right time. Each medium has its strengths. To be able to create them all enables us as communicators, as online entrepreneurs to communicate more effectively at the right time. For example, let’s just go through different types of content. I’ve just argued the case for the written content.

Let’s think about visual content. Visual content is really good today, obviously, it’s a very visual web. But what I found is the visual content helps you to get shared, it helps you to get exposure. It helps you to become known. People share visuals on Pinterest, Instagram, Google Images, help us to become known and found through visual content. Creating visual is really important because it helps us to become more known, it helps us to become shared.

Video is great, also for being found. We’re seeing video coming into the search engine results more and more. But for me, the strength of videos, that helps us to be liked. We talked about visual content helps us to be known. I think video helps us to be liked. It shows who we are. It shows people our expertise. It shows people our sense of humor, our delivery style. It helps us to become liked. It helps us to build credibility. It helps us also to illustrate ideas and processes in a way that text sometimes struggles to do. To be able to show someone this is how I do something, that’s something that you can’t do in text but it’s so much easier sometimes in video. Video is really good in that.

For me, the strength of audio is that it’s incredibly personal. I lost count of the number of times at Social Media Marketing World that people came out to me and said, “You know I feel like I talk to you every week. I feel like we have conversations. I feel like I know you on a deeper level.” There’s something very intimate about putting ear buds in the ears and listening to the voice of someone. It helps people to make a connection with you on a really deeper level. It helps people to build trust with you.

We often talk about people want to know, like and trust you. We want to be known. We want to be liked. We want to be trusted. For me, if you’re using these different types of mediums, it enables you to be known, to be liked and trusted. Particularly, if you bring those different types of medium together.

I guess what I’m trying to say here is there’s real advantages of text but there are also real advantages of these other mediums as well. If possible, gather as many skills as you can in those different areas because there’s something very powerful that happens when you bring those things together.

My friend, Colin Gray, he’s spoke at our Australian event, ProBlogger event last year. He has a blog podcast called The Podcast Host. At last year’s event, in Australia, he talked about something that I’ve never heard anyone talked about before, he called it Content Stacking, Content Stacking as a way to communicate more effectively. He talked about designing a series of content or a season of content that takes people through a number of pieces of content or a number of different types of content. He talked about bringing written word, podcast, video, visual content together to create a stack of content that leads people through a learning process. I think it’s really an interesting audio.

Ever since I heard him talking about that, it’s something that I’ve been wanting to do more and more often. I’ll link in the show notes today an article that Colin wrote on that particular topic. In fact, it’s actually a series of articles that he wrote on that topic. I’ve really been digging into that series. On ProBlogger, we’re going to be exploring content stacking a little bit more in the coming months. You’re going to see us roll out some content that is stacked. It will take us a couple of months to get it together but you’re going to see us put together some content that’s written content and audio content and video content and some visual content as well that will walk you through a process over on ProBlogger. It’s something that we’re putting together at the moment. We’ll present almost like a course but I could see it being done on a blog as well. I really encourage you to really grapple with bringing the different types of content together but don’t throw out written content.

Is written content dead? No, way. Keep creating it. There are so many reasons to do it.

Should it be the only type of content you create? This is really going to come down to your goals but I think most bloggers today should be mixing their mediums. They shouldn’t be just creating single medium blogs.

I still think there is a place for single medium blogs. Someone like Seth Godin, is a great example. Seth Godin is a gifted writer. He writes really well and his articles are short and punchy, they’re short but they’re powerful and I think he presents those articles in a really good  way. He’s a gifted writer and so that’s all he does. You go look at his blog, it looks like my blog in 2002. There are no images on it at all. He’s got a bald head and his glasses a part of his brand. But really, vast majority of the content he’s creating is written content.

It can be done that you just focus on one medium. If you are an amazing writer, write. If you are a gifted video maker, go with video. If you’re audio is your skill, be a podcaster. There are no rules. You can focus on one of the mediums but I think most bloggers today are bringing these different types of mediums together but don’t give up on the written word. I guess that’s my message for tonight. Don’t give up on the written word. It still does have a big place on the web today.

If you want to listen to a little bit more, explore some of these things a little bit more, I’ve got two podcast episodes for you to go back and listen to. Firstly episode 97, I talked about embeddable content. I think this is the easiest way to get multimedia onto your blog today. Some of you are listening to this and going, “Yeah, I do written word but I don’t know how to do visuals. I don’t know how to do video. I don’t know how to do audio.” The easiest way to get those different types of mediums onto your blog is to embed content other people have created.

You go to YouTube and find the best video possible. 99% of those videos on YouTube, you can embed onto your blog. That content creators wants you to embed that content on your blog and this is the easiest way to get these different mediums onto your blog alongside that written content you’ve created.

If you want to learn more about embeddable content, go back and listen to episode 97 of the ProBlogger podcast. It’s sitting there on iTunes or you can go over to the show notes as well. I talked about some of the different types content that you can be embedding onto your blog.

The other one that you might want to listen to is episode 134 which is one where I talked about how to choose which social network but also which medium is best for your blog. If you’re just starting out and you want to experiment with adding a different type of medium into your blog but you don’t know whether you should video or you don’t know whether you should do audio or you should do something else, that episode 134 is one that you can go back and listen to. It asks you some questions, it gives you some questions to begin to explore which medium might be best for you.

Hopefully, they’ll help you. That’s episode 97 and episode 134. Otherwise, dig into the archives. There are 186 previous episodes of this podcast. There’s plenty to listen to. Lastly, don’t forget to join the ProBlogger Facebook group. We’ve seen explosion of people joining that group out over the last little while. If you want to find us, I setup a redirect for you to make it easy for you to find, just type into your browser ProBlogger.com/group and you’ll be forwarded straight to that group.

Thanks for listening. I’m looking forward to chatting with you further of the ProBlogger Facebook group or over on the show notes as well. You can find today’s show notes at ProBlogger.com/podcast/187.

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Grab Your Earlybird Tickets to ProBlogger Evolve Conference and Mastermind Today

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/eM4pJpkL0ik/

Today tickets go on sale for ProBlogger Evolve – two events in Australia for bloggers.

Yes you read that correctly – after 7 previous years of one event per year – we’re trying something new by running two events in two cities over two weekends.

We’re calling it ProBlogger Evolve because we think the way blogs are monetised really does need to evolve. The time we spend together will really focus in on some of the emerging models people are using to monetise blogs.

Here’s what you need to know about ProBlogger Evolve Firstly where and when:

Brisbane – at Brisbane Rydges Southbank Hotel on 29-30 July
Melbourne – at Melbourne Rydges CBD Hotel on 5-6 August

Secondly – our new format of conference and masterminds

This year we’re trying a new format.

Day 1 Conference – in both cities the first day will be a single day conference to examine monetisation strategies through the lens of 4 key pillars of blogging – those of Content, Engagement, Traffic and Conversion. These days will be everyone in a single track for a full day.

Day 2 Mastermind – the second day is mastermind day and will be more intimate (we’re limiting it to 32 attendees) and a chance to dive deep into the business model(s) best suited to you and to spend time brainstorming, planning, asking questions about your blog and business.

Day 1 will be pitched at a level that is accessible for everyone but day 2 will be at a higher level for those who want to not only learn some of the great topics we’ll cover on day 1 but who want to talk through how to apply it to their business.

So there will be two ticket types:

Conference only ticket (just day 1) Conference + Mastermind (both days) Thirdly – let’s talk about our exciting international keynote presenter…

Last week in San Diego I did a little Facebook live to announce to our Facebook community who is keynoting the event this year.

So this year Pat Flynn is returning to our event for the second time. Pat came out in 2014 an has been one of our most highly rated speakers ever.

Pat will be our closing keynote at the Day 1 Conference in both cities (as well as involved on that day with Q&A) but will be heavily involved in the mastermind days too – so those taking that opportunity will all have an opportunity to sit around a table with him in a small group to ask questions, brainstorm on your blog together and learn from his years of experience.

Earlybird Tickets Available Now for a Limited Time

We’re still putting the rest of our lineup for this year’s events together but wanted to let you know what we’re planning and also today are making Earlybird Tickets available.

These earlybird tickets give you $100 off both ticket types. This will be available for two days only (10pm AEDT on 30 March).

The Earlybird Ticket Prices are:

Conference only ticket – $299 (AUD) Conference + Mastermind – $1199 (AUD)

There are limited numbers of tickets available in both cities and extremely limited numbers of tickets (and a high interest from what we can tell) in the mastermind tickets – so to avoid disappointment we suggest securing your tickets as soon as possible.

Get full details of what’s included in tickets and what we’re planning in terms of the agenda on our events page which is where you can also now pick up your tickets.

PS: For those of you in the US – we have an event for you too!

If you’re in the USA an want to get to a ProBlogger event you’re in luck.

This year I’m cohosting an event called the Success Incubator in Dallas Texas on 24-25 October and you can also pick up an Earlybird ticket to that event until 31 March.

The post Grab Your Earlybird Tickets to ProBlogger Evolve Conference and Mastermind Today appeared first on ProBlogger.

      


Grab Your Earlybird Tickets to ProBlogger Evolve Conference and Mastermind Today

Originally published on: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/aySb0DV9SPQ/

Today tickets go on sale for ProBlogger Evolve – two events in Australia for bloggers.

Yes you read that correctly – after 7 previous years of one event per year – we’re trying something new by running two events in two cities over two weekends.

We’re calling it ProBlogger Evolve because we think the way blogs are monetised really does need to evolve. The time we spend together will really focus in on some of the emerging models people are using to monetise blogs.

Here’s what you need to know about ProBlogger Evolve Firstly where and when:

Brisbane – at Brisbane Rydges Southbank Hotel on 29-30 July
Melbourne – at Melbourne Rydges CBD Hotel on 5-6 August

Secondly – our new format of conference and masterminds

This year we’re trying a new format.

Day 1 Conference – in both cities the first day will be a single day conference to examine monetisation strategies through the lens of 4 key pillars of blogging – those of Content, Engagement, Traffic and Conversion. These days will be everyone in a single track for a full day.

Day 2 Mastermind – the second day is mastermind day and will be more intimate (we’re limiting it to 32 attendees) and a chance to dive deep into the business model(s) best suited to you and to spend time brainstorming, planning, asking questions about your blog and business.

Day 1 will be pitched at a level that is accessible for everyone but day 2 will be at a higher level for those who want to not only learn some of the great topics we’ll cover on day 1 but who want to talk through how to apply it to their business.

So there will be two ticket types:

Conference only ticket (just day 1) Conference + Mastermind (both days) Thirdly – let’s talk about our exciting international keynote presenter…

Last week in San Diego I did a little Facebook live to announce to our Facebook community who is keynoting the event this year.

So this year Pat Flynn is returning to our event for the second time. Pat came out in 2014 an has been one of our most highly rated speakers ever.

Pat will be our closing keynote at the Day 1 Conference in both cities (as well as involved on that day with Q&A) but will be heavily involved in the mastermind days too – so those taking that opportunity will all have an opportunity to sit around a table with him in a small group to ask questions, brainstorm on your blog together and learn from his years of experience.

Earlybird Tickets Available Now for a Limited Time

We’re still putting the rest of our lineup for this year’s events together but wanted to let you know what we’re planning and also today are making Earlybird Tickets available.

These earlybird tickets give you $100 off both ticket types. This will be available for two days only (10pm AEDT on 30 March).

The Earlybird Ticket Prices are:

Conference only ticket – $299 (AUD) Conference + Mastermind – $1199 (AUD)

There are limited numbers of tickets available in both cities and extremely limited numbers of tickets (and a high interest from what we can tell) in the mastermind tickets – so to avoid disappointment we suggest securing your tickets as soon as possible.

Get full details of what’s included in tickets and what we’re planning in terms of the agenda on our events page which is where you can also now pick up your tickets.

PS: For those of you in the US – we have an event for you too!

If you’re in the USA an want to get to a ProBlogger event you’re in luck.

This year I’m cohosting an event called the Success Incubator in Dallas Texas on 24-25 October and you can also pick up an Earlybird ticket to that event until 31 March.

The post Grab Your Earlybird Tickets to ProBlogger Evolve Conference and Mastermind Today appeared first on ProBlogger.